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In this issue

 
Cameron’s dilemma Print E-mail

By trying to appease euroskeptics the British prime minister risks alienating EU allies

By Ralf Sotscheck

July 14, 2014

Will they stay or will they go? After British Prime Minister David Cameron failed to block the EU Commission presidency of Luxembourg national Jean-Claude Juncker, Britain is sliding closer to a “Brexit” – the exit of Britain from the European Union.

This prospect is not altered by Cameron’s truculent statement following his defeat at the forced summit vote in Brussels, that the best solution for Britain was, and would still be, to remain part of a – reformed – EU. And that he intends to press ahead with these reforms – if he wins elections scheduled for the spring of next year.

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Prosperity for all? Print E-mail

The TTIP free trade deal promises economic growth and low prices, but hands corporations even more power

By Heike Buchter, Wolfgang Uchatius und Petra Pinzler

July 14, 2014

Sometimes when Don Shawcroft rides on horseback through the expanses of the western prairie, he thinks of Europe. Alongside him, hoofs thunder and whips crack as his cowboys drive a herd of black cattle, a few hundred thousand dollars with horns.

Shawcroft and his men are heading for Colorado’s San Juan Mountains where, at an altitude of 3,000 meters, the livestock will spend the summer, breathing the fresh air and eating the succulent mountain grass. Then they go back to the stables and get a hormone capsule in their ear.

Shawcroft, 55, wears a broad-rimmed hat and spurs on his boots, just like his father and grandfather did. The Shawcrofts have been raising cattle for 135 years. Their livelihood has stayed the same, but its methods have changed.

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Record role model Print E-mail

That’s Miroslav Klose. In the World Cup final he did not score. When coach Joachim Löw took him off, he gave his substitute Mario Götze a few words of friendly advice as he went on the pitch. Later, Götze scores in extra time against Argentina (top).
That’s Miroslav Klose. In the World Cup final he did not score. When coach Joachim Löw took him off, he gave his substitute Mario Götze a few words of friendly advice as he went on the pitch. Later, Götze scores in extra time against Argentina (top).

Miroslav Klose is now the top FIFA goal scorer and a mainstay of Germany’s World Cup success

By Sebastian Stier

July 14, 2014

Brazil’s football idol Ronaldo sat in the commentator box staring ahead. Down below, on the pitch at the Belo Horizonte stadium, a man was celebrating who had just deprived Ronaldo of his record. Over the course of his career, Ronaldo scored 15 goals in World Cup competition, but Miroslav Klose was now celebrating his 16th. At this point, the Brazilians were facing double humiliation: Klose stole the goal record from their hero and helped the German team to beat Brazil 7:1. A historic result.

Miroslav Klose’s post-match comments speak volumes about him as a person. Klose could have overdone the jubilation or delivered grandiloquent speeches. He could have posted images of himself on the Internet via Twitter or Facebook, like his younger colleagues do. But Klose did nothing of the sort, he just said it was nice to hold the record. No more, and no less.

Mirsoslav Klose is so modest he actually no longer fits into the world of over-exuberant, over-hyped professional sports. Now 36-years old, he will probably end his career next summer, although many in Germany would like to see the striker playing for as long as possible. One of those people is Germany’s coach Joachim Löw. In the German game right now, there is no real successor to the forward in sight.

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